Archways to Opportunity


KYW Career News Reports, May 13, 2018

Accenture’s Roxanne Taylor Appointed to AESC Global Board of Directors

Accenture’s Roxanne Taylor Appointed to AESC Global Board of Directors
https://www.aesc.org/insights/press-releases/accentures-roxanne-taylor-appointed-aesc-global-board-directors

Former Chief Marketing & Communications Officer at Accenture, Taylor Brings Brand Vision and Digital-First Expertise to Global Executive Search and Leadership Consulting Association.

The Association of Executive Search and Leadership Consultants (AESC) has appointed Roxanne Taylor, formerly chief marketing & communications officer at Accenture, to its board as an independent director. The AESC Global Board of Directors combines elected representatives from each of AESC’s three Regional Councils: Americas; Asia Pacific and Middle East; Europe and Africa, with now two independent directors. Taylor is only the second independent director appointed to the AESC Board in the association’s nearly 60-year history, after the appointment of Stefan Spang of McKinsey & Company in 2017.

Based in New York, Taylor spent the past 23 years at Accenture, serving as the company’s chief marketing & communications officer for more than 10 years. She was instrumental in shaping Accenture as a global, market-leading brand, and more recently, actualizing the company’s digital-first and innovation-led strategy. Taylor’s passion for technology and her ability to drive innovation in brand-building led to her success in developing new digital platforms at Accenture, where she led a global team of more than 1,000 marketing and communications professionals and served as a member of Accenture’s Global Management Committee.

Paul Benson, AESC Board Chair and Regional Market Leader, Europe Middle East & Africa, Global Industrial Market at Korn Ferry, commented, “Roxanne’s deep expertise in global marketing and branding, Professional Services, as well as digital innovation will provide a critical perspective to the AESC Board as we continue to focus on the digital transformations of both the organizations we serve and our own profession.”

Prior to joining Accenture in 1995, Taylor held business, investor relations and marketing roles for Reuters, Citicorp, Credit Suisse and the Deak-Perera Group. Named as one of Forbes’ “World’s Most Influential CMOs,” she is a member of the Marketing 50, Arthur W. Page Society, The Committee of 200 and Women’s Forum of New York. She previously served on the board of the Ad Council and currently serves on the Business Committee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Taylor stated: “I’m delighted to join the board for the association of the executive search and leadership consulting profession which has such an important impact on organizations worldwide. As the already rapid rate of change continues to accelerate due to technological advancements—agility, foresight and entrepreneurial thinking will guide tomorrow’s most successful businesses. I look forward to helping shape the future course and strategy of AESC—in turn serving its global members and the clients they serve with the insights I have gleaned over the course of my career at Accenture and beyond.”

Taylor’s appointment follows a search process managed by AESC’s Nominating and Governance committee, chaired by Krista Walochik, AESC Board Chair Emeritus and Chair at executive search and leadership advisory firm Talengo/The Global Community for Leaders (TGCL), headquartered in Madrid. The AESC Board of Directors ensures that AESC membership represents the highest quality standard in the executive search and leadership consulting profession globally. “Roxanne will bring an integral outside perspective to the board as we navigate new opportunities in an era of rapid business transformation and innovation,” stated Walochik.
For inquiries please contact:

Joe Chappell
AESC
+1 646 757 5492
jchappell@aesc.org

Samuel Hyland
Accenture
+1 917 452 5184
samuel.hyland@accenture.com

About the Association of Executive Search and Leadership Consultants

AESC is the voice of excellence for the executive search and leadership consulting profession worldwide. Its rigorous Code of Professional Practice guides members in nearly 1,300 offices in 74 countries and beyond to serve as strategic advisors on behalf of their clients. In turn, AESC members are best positioned to provide companies with a competitive advantage—the ability to find, attract and develop the best talent in the world and ensure that executives are successfully integrated. Visit us at www.aesc.org.

Show Me The Diversity


KYW Career News Reports, April 22, 2018

Drug Testing Decline


KYW Career News Reports, April 8, 2018

Hiring vampires and other missteps that hurt young companies

Hiring vampires and other missteps that hurt young companies

As vice president for talent at a technology startup, Steve Cadigan knew his company had enormous growth potential. But to realize it, he would have to win the war for talent against some industry giants.

“I was physically surrounded by Google buildings. I had Apple down the freeway, Facebook up the freeway and, in San Francisco, there were sexy, little technology darlings like Twitter and Zynga,” Cadigan said.

By comparison, his company at the time, LinkedIn, looked humdrum to many job seekers. Furthermore, it lacked the financial reserves to match the salaries and perks the coolest companies of Silicon Valley delivered.

Yet during his 3.5 years as VP of Talent, LinkedIn grew from 400 employees to 4,000, executed a successful IPO and grew annual revenues to nearly $1 billion. During a one-on-one talk, Cadigan shared some of the biggest talent lessons he learning while driving growth at LinkedIn and other companies.

Build an employer brand

Young companies need uniquely talented, highly motivated individuals to drive growth, but lack the resources and profile to attract top candidates.

At LinkedIn and elsewhere, Cadigan overcame that hurdle by developing a distinctive employer brand and offering a compelling value proposition to employees. LinkedIn’s brand, for example, included the opportunity to work alongside brilliant professionals and shape an emerging company while creating a product that would help other people find their dream jobs.

Don’t hire vampires

In the rush to place warm bodies in needed positions, managers sometimes hire imperfect fits. Taking the time to identify the traits you need in new hires and recruiting until you find them ultimately produces better results.

“Cutting corners and sacrificing quality standards for talent is a huge mistake,” Cadigan said. “You get some people who are wrong for the organization, and dealing with that becomes a huge distraction. It’s like having a vampire loose inside the organization. It sucks the life out of you.”

Beware of battlefield promotions

In a similar rush to fill managerial positions, executives sometimes give subject-matter experts “battlefield promotions” without assessing the individuals’ management skills and end up with under-performing managers.

The more effective practice is to take the time to provide leadership development within the company, create career advancement opportunities for skilled employees who wouldn’t make good managers, and search for highly skilled managers outside the company.